It's with great sadness at Kalexiko that we learn of the death of Apple mastermind Steve Jobs after having suffered a long battle with pancreatic cancer. He was 56.

An inspirational businessman and technology advocate, his influence can be found in nearly every household, workplace and playground, at every bus stop, in every gym and in almost every public space in the UK. The products he helped create changed the face of technology; from the first Apple computers in the 1970s up to the latest iPhone 4S launched just this week. Under his stewardship Apple delivered powerful yet aesthetically pleasing computers and devices, helping to make it one of the most profitable companies in the world. Legions of fans will mourn his passing.

Jobs, along with Steve Wozniak and Ronald Wayne, first founded Apple in 1976, designing several ranges of home computers culminating in the release of the Apple Macintosh in 1984. Whilst the Macintosh was eventually a great success, Jobs left the company in 1985, starting up a new Silicon Valley venture of his own that Apple would in fact go on to later acquire.

His return to Apple in 1997 heralded a new era in its success, with the iMac computer introducing a new emphasis on sleekness, functionality and aestheticism previously unseen in home computing. Over the following decade, Apple under Jobs' leadership embarked on an impressive programme of product diversification and vertical integration, opening retail stores and introducing the iPod. This would revolutionise how people consume music and set the tone for products to follow including the iPhone and iPad. Today Apple is the largest technology company on the planet.

Tributes have been pouring in from around the world, with friends, associates, technology luminaries and even presidents amongst those to pay their respects. Naturally at Kalexiko our thoughts are with his family at this time.

The Apple juggernaut will inexorably roll on, and his legacy will live on in the great products he helped create, as well as the dynamic technology-centric lifestyle he advocated. The technology industry, however, will be a poorer place for his passing.

If we may, we'd like to leave you with a quote from the man himself that we think is rather fitting for such a time:

'When I was 17, I read a quote that went something like 'If you live each day as if it was your last, someday you'll most certainly be right.' It made an impression on me, and since then, for the past 33 years, I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: 'If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?' And whenever the answer has been 'No' for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something.'

Steve Jobs: Rest In Peace